East Gippsland Shire Council

Flood information for the East Gippsland Shire Council, encompassing local flood guides for Lakes Entrance, Eagle Point, Metung, Paynesville and Raymond Island as well as the East Gippsland Shire Municipal Flood and Emergency Plan.

On this page:

East Gippsland is home to the Genoa, Cann, Bemm, Tambo, Nicholson, Snowy, Buchan and 

East Gippsland municipal map
East Gippsland municipal map.


Mitchell Rivers and the Gippsland Lakes. Weather systems commonly referred to as East Coast Lows can produce heavy rainfall on frequent occasions which can lead to minor riverine flooding with major flood events in both the rivers and lakes occurring more rarely.

For example, during June 2007, four major east coast lows occurred in succession with each one producing heavy rainfall.  The last east coast low brought up to 300mm of rainfall resulting in major riverine flooding across the Council area and the Gippsland Lakes rising 1.3m above normal levels.

A significant risk is isolation of communities, vehicles and recreational visitors through the area when rivers and creeks rise, landslips and falling vegetation make roads impassable. Storms can also cause power and communication outages simultaneous to flooding.

Are you at risk of flood? 
 

Bruthen to Swan Hill flood map
  Click to enlarge.

Flooding in Bruthen is most common on the low-lying farm land on the Tambo River floodplain
between Bruthen in the North and Tambo Upper in the South.

This flooding may isolate a number of rural properties and dwellings. To the south of Bruthen, flooding can occur in the area of Mossiface, continuing East.

The Mossiface - Swan Reach Rd is often cut at Mossiface, and the Tambo Upper Rd may be cut in various places along its length.

Several sections along the Tambo Upper Road and Stephenson Road are impacted by water during moderate and major floods and these sections become closed due to flood waters.

Old Orbost Road is cut at Tambo UpperRoad. Stephenson Road is cut where it connects with the Tambo Upper Road at the Fred Albert Bridge.

Road closures do not pose a threat of isolation to the towns in the area due to the availability of alternate routes, except in extreme circumstances.

Flooding of the Tambo River (upstream of Bruthen) has been known to cause closure of the Great Alpine Road due to landslips. High river levels erode the banks of the Tambo River, making the Great Alpine Road unstable. As a result this can isolate the communities of Ensay, Swift’s Creek and Omeo.

With regard to rural properties - when considering the impacts of a potential flood, plenty of time should be allowed to move stock and machinery that may be located on the floodplain. Hay bales should be stored on high ground to avoid them being washed away by flood waters. Access across the river via private bridges should be treated with extreme caution during times of flood.

The map above shows the expected flooding for the Bruthen to Swan Reach area. A major flood event occurs at 10 meters on the Tambo River Ramrod Creek junction gauge, North East of Bruthen. This is what flooding would look like when experiencing a 1 in 100 year flood.

Are you at risk of flood?

Eagle point flood map
  Click to enlarge.

The Gippsland Lakes have a history of flooding. In Eagle Point, low-lying community infrastructure such as boat ramps, car parks and jetties are impacted by flooding from both the Mitchell River and Gippsland Lakes.

Boat ramps, jetties and car parks flood early which can cause unwary boat owners to return and find their cars flooded.

Properties along the Mitchell River Silt Jetties are generally isolated early due to high velocity flows from the Mitchell River.

The properties most at risk are on Rivermouth Road on the Silt Jetties between the Mitchell River and Lake King, and those facing Lake King along Bay Road. Boats in marinas and jetties will need their mooring lines adjusted as the lake heights build and recede.

The map to the right shows likely flooding at the Minor Flood Level, the 2007 flood event and the effects of a 1% flood in Eagle Point. A 1% flood means there is a 1% chance of a flood this size occurring in any year.

Are you at risk of flood?

Lakes Entrance flood map
 Click to enlarge.

The Gippsland Lakes have a history of flooding. In Eagle Point, low-lying community infrastructure such as boat ramps, car parks and jetties are impacted by flooding from both the Mitchell River and Gippsland Lakes.

Boat ramps, jetties and car parks flood early which can cause unwary boat owners to return and find their cars flooded.

Properties along the Mitchell River Silt Jetties are generally isolated early due to high velocity flows from the Mitchell River.

The properties most at risk are on Rivermouth Road on the Silt Jetties between the Mitchell River and Lake King, and those facing Lake King along Bay Road. Boats in marinas and jetties will need their mooring lines adjusted as the lake heights build and recede.

The map above below shows the expected flooding for the Bruthen to Swan Reach area. A major flood event occurs at 10 meters on the Tambo River Ramrod Creek junction gauge, North East of Bruthen. This is what flooding would look like when experiencing a 1 in 100 year flood.

Are you at risk of flood?

metung flood map
Click to enlarge.

Flooding typically occurs in Metung one to three days after the Latrobe, Thomson, Macalister, Avon, Mitchell, Nicholson and/or Tambo Rivers have experienced flooding.

Flood peaks will slow to rise and fall, sometimes taking up to two weeks for floodwater to recede.

Wind can increase the lake levels around Metung by up to 50 centimetres. Metung and Tambo Bay are not at risk of large numbers of properties flooding, however some roads may be closed.

Properties on Shaving Point may have some flood impact where they front onto Lake King but flooding does not normally occur above floor level.

There are many marinas and jetties around Metung where boats will need their mooring lines adjusted to accommodate the rise and fall in lake height.

Access to Metung is via the Princes Highway and Metung Road. If Metung Road becomes impassable where it follows the Tambo River below Swan Reach, alternative access is via Nungurner Road.

The map to the right shows the Minor flood level (0.8 metres), the Major level (1.9 metres) and the 1% level, meaning there is a 1% chance of this kind of flood occurring each year.

Are you at risk of flood?

Paynesville flood map
Click to enlarge.

Flooding typically occurs in the Paynesville community one to three days after the Latrobe,Thomson, Macalister, Avon, Mitchell and/or Tambo Rivers have experienced flooding.

Flood peaks are slow to rise and recede, sometimes taking up to two weeks. Wind can increase lake levels around Paynesville by up to 50 centimetres.

Many parts of Paynesville are located above the flood level, however local road closures may require residents to seek alternative routes to Bairnsdale and create access problems to local shops and businesses.

Properties on Burrabogie Island and along Slip Road are the most at risk of isolation and over floor flooding.

In Paynesville there is low-lying community infrastructure such as boat ramps, car parks, and jetties that are impacted by flooding. Boats in marinas and on jetties will need their mooring lines adjusted as the lake heights build and recede.

The map to the right shows the 2007 flood extent, which was 1.5 metres, and the Minor Flood Level, which is 0.7 metres on the McMillan Straits at Paynesville Gauge.

Are you at risk of flood 

Raymond Island flood map
Click to enter.

Flooding typically occurs on Raymond Island one to three days after the Latrobe, Thomson,
Macalister, Avon, Mitchell, Nicholson and/or Tambo Rivers have experienced flooding.

Flood peaks are slow to rise and recede, sometimes taking up to two weeks. Wind can increase the lake levels around Raymond Island by up to 50 centimetres.

On Raymond Island there is low-lying community infrastructure such as boat ramps, car parks, and jetties that can be impacted by Gippsland Lakes flooding.

The Raymond Island Ferry stops operating at the Minor Flood Level resulting in isolation of the island which can last up to two weeks.

There are many homes and sheds in low-lying areas close to the water. These properties, along with local roads are subject to flooding at low levels. This in turn impacts on Raymond Island residents’ ability to travel within the island, causing properties to become isolated within the island. Boats in marinas and jetties will need their mooring lines adjusted as the lake heights build and recede.

The maps below show the 2007 flood extent, which was 1.5 metres at the McMillan Straits at Paynesville Gauge, and the Minor Flood Level which is 0.7 metres at the McMillan Straits at Paynesville Gauge.

About Flood Guides

Communities can use local flood guides to identify and better understand their local flood risk. They include information about: flood history, how to prepare & respond to floods and who to contact.

Contact Information

For more information, contact the Gippsland (East) Region Headquarters.
For information on flood warnings, see the VicEmergency website
Your local Catchment Mangement Authority: East Gippsland.

Local VICSES Units

  • Bairnsdale VICSES Unit
    Cnr Ligar and Macleod Streets,
  • Bairnsdale, Victoria 3875
  • Bendoc VICSES Unit
    9 Jamieson Street,
  • Bendoc, Victoria 3888
  •  
  • Bruthen VICSES Unit
    Main Street,
  • Bruthen, Victoria 3875
  •  
  • Buchan VICSES Unit
    Orbost Road,
  • Buchan, Victoria 3885
  • Cann River VICSES Unit
  • Monaro Highway, 
  • Cann River, Victoria 3890
  •  
  • Mallacoota VICSES Unit
    Lees Road, PO Box 493,
    Mallacoota, Victoria 3892
  •  
  • Orbost VICSES Unit
    5 Wolseley Street,
  • Orbost, Victoria 3888
  •  
  • Tambo Valley VICSES Unit
    Omeo Highway,
  • Swifts Creek,  Victoria  3896

Municipal Flood Emergency Plans (MFEP)

Municipalities can use Municipal Flood Emergency Plans to prepare, respond and recover from flood and storm events.
East Gippsland Municipal Flood Emergency Plan - Without Gippsland Lakes and
East Gippsland Municipal Flood Emergency Plan - Gippsland Lakes